Lights Out at Jackson Hole Mountain Today

Power outages in Teton Village have left Jackson Hole with no option other than to be closed today.

Last night, Feb. 7, at about 7pm, eight or more power poles fell in Teton Village as a result of winds reaching over 70 mph.

Teton Village road closed for a few hours last night stranding people at the resort and surrounding areas with no power.

The road reopened around 9pm but the power has remained out. Jackson Hole Mountain Resort’s head of PR, Anna Cole, released a statement late last night: “There’s no way we’ll be operating [tomorrow, Feb. 8],” she said. “It sounds like it’s going to be all hands on deck. Our groomers will most likely be assisting Lower Valley to help move snow and clear the lines.”

Teton Pass, just south of the resort, connecting Wyoming to Idaho, was also closed for 24-plus hours yesterday due to avalanches crossing the roadway.

Jackson Hole Mountain Resort has received 29 inches of snow in the last 48 hours bringing their season total to 403 inches.

 

Source: Jackson Hole Mountain Resort Closes Due to Storm – Ski Mag

Fear and Loathing on Mt. Kenya – with Hyenas!

The beast sauntered away while we stood there stunned. And then, 20 yards out, the eyes reappeared. And then another pair. And another. And another. A row of yellow eyes looked at us, single file, shoulder to shoulder. Without thinking I picked up a rock and threw it at the eyes.

by Jason Haas, ClimbingZine.com

“Hey, wake up. Wake up!” Brian whispered harshly. “There’s someone out there.”

I half opened an eye and begrudgingly listened to the deafening silence. “I don’t hear anything man, I’m sure it’s nothing.”

“SHHHHH!!!!” Brian’s face was pressed against the mesh fabric of the tent, as he peered out into the darkness. I thought of making a smart-ass comment, then thought better of it. I closed my eyes and started to roll over as the cacophony of falling pots and pans bolted me out of my sleeping bag. “I told you!”

“Get the zipper!” I barked back. Clad in nothing more than shorts, we tore out of the tent and into the moonlight. Our packs were gone.

Brian Young and I were graduating college from the flatlands of Michigan and in dire need of an adventure. We had been sport climbing for about two years and just started to learn how to trad climb. While pitching ideas to each other, Brian suggested clipping bolts on the shores of Thailand.

A Narrow Escape on Mt. Kenya by Jason Haas
FEB 6 • UNCATEGORIZED • 494 VIEWS • NO COMMENTS ON A NARROW ESCAPE ON MT. KENYA BY JASON HAAS
“Hey, wake up. Wake up!” Brian whispered harshly. “There’s someone out there.”

I half opened an eye and begrudgingly listened to the deafening silence. “I don’t hear anything man, I’m sure it’s nothing.”

“SHHHHH!!!!” Brian’s face was pressed against the mesh fabric of the tent, as he peered out into the darkness. I thought of making a smart-ass comment, then thought better of it. I closed my eyes and started to roll over as the cacophony of falling pots and pans bolted me out of my sleeping bag. “I told you!”

by Jason Haas

Spoiler altert: This piece is an excerpt from Volume 7. Get your own here.

“Get the zipper!” I barked back. Clad in nothing more than shorts, we tore out of the tent and into the moonlight. Our packs were gone.

Brian Young and I were graduating college from the flatlands of Michigan and in dire need of an adventure. We had been sport climbing for about two years and just started to learn how to trad climb. While pitching ideas to each other, Brian suggested clipping bolts on the shores of Thailand.

I countered with a fading ice runnel up Mt. Kenya in Africa. I don’t remember how we decided, but somehow I won. Brian had never been out of the country before and was nervous about going to a third-world country. I did my best to calm his fears, but my carefree “The Dude abides” attitude was no match for Murphy’s Law. The airlines lost our bags, forcing us to roam the streets of Nairobi for several days before boarding the bus to the mountain.

Being days behind schedule, even as the sweltering equatorial heat broiled the flesh on all eighteen of the oily, unbathed, musty people crammed into the passenger van jostling down dusty, pothole-riddled roads, our excitement remained high. But just as the heat and smell from our human jambalaya became too much, the van would pull over to the side of the road, the stifling air would stagnate from a lack of motion, and another person would literally shove their way into the van. This went on for hours until finally, like an overstuffed burrito, we split at the seams and oozed out of the van. Like leaving a greasy spoon diner, the stench stayed with us long after we’d been dropped off at the park gate to the mountain.

We filed the necessary paperwork, paid our fees, shouldered our packs, and looked to the north – the mountain was socked in with bad weather and ominous clouds threatened to rain down in a torrential furry. It wasn’t the kind of rain where you get soaked and are annoyed at how wet your stuff gets. It was the kind of rain where the evaporating oasis mud pools flood into great lakes and rivers and villages are swept away. We had ten miles to hike through the jungle before reaching camp. Our enthusiasm drained and without words, we disappeared into the jungle. As the miles slowly ticked by, the clouds darkened and a clap of thunder nearly knocked us off our feet. Dead serious, I turned to Brian and said, “If it starts raining, we’re making camp right here.”

“Hell no we are not! Things live in the jungle, man. I mean big things. Look at that!”

Source: A Narrow Escape on Mt. Kenya by Jason Haas | The Climbing ZineThe Climbing Zine | Celebrating A Climbing Existence

Record-breaking Irishman rows Atlantic after beating alcohol and heroin addiction 

He burnt around 8,000 calories a day and lost approximately 20% of his body weight over the duration of the race

by ANITA MCSORLEY, Irish Mirror

An Irish former heroin addict and alcoholic who tried to kill himself became a superfit endurance athlete and rowing across the Atlantic – sponsored by a whiskey company.

He lived in a squat for 15 years and tried to commit suicide because he couldn’t accept the fact that he was gay.

He bravely held off the challenge of a three man American team, to finish the race in third place. 30 minutes was all that separated the two boats after 49 days of relentless ocean rowing, in what was an historically close finish.

Upon arrival at Antigua, he raised the Irish Tricolour to salute the large crowd gathered to watch him complete the race.

Source: Record-breaking Irishman rows Atlantic after beating alcohol and heroin addiction – Irish Mirror Online

Brazilian diving team breaks up over partner’s ‘marathon sex session’ with canoeist

A good teammate can make all the difference…

Pedroso got sexiled out of her room in Olympic Village the night before the event.

Source: Brazilian diving team breaks up over partner’s ‘marathon sex session’ with canoeist

Climber Spotlight: Wade Morris

When it comes to getting after it—and by getting after it, I mean wild and challenging pre-dawn mountain adventures—Wade Morris is easily one of the first climbers who comes to mind.

Source: Climber Spotlight: Wade Morris

Jim Walmsley’s Insane Day at Western States | Outside Online

We’ve all had our bad races and ‘off days’… but this is taking it to a whole ‘nother level.

For well over an hour, an eternity even by ultrarunning standards, the Flagstaff native was nowhere to be found. Walmsley had missed a tight left turn and veered well off course. A crew of photographers finally spotted him lying on the 105-degree pavement of Highway 49. He’d given up the record, the lead, and, realistically, any chance of a top 10 finish.

Source: Jim Walmsley’s Insane Day at Western States | Outside Online

14ers ThruHike – A walk to all of the Colorado 14ers

While Eric Lee hitches rides from friends in an attempt to beat the record for climbing all of Colorado’s 14ers, here is some background on a similar feat completed in 2013, without cars…

Between July 20th and September 29th of 2013 two Colorado hikers summited all 58 of the state’s 14ers by walking from each peak to the next, unsupported by a crew. Here’s a map of their travels.

Source: 14ers ThruHike | A walk to all of the Colorado 14ers

Gearing up for a self supported trip from Durango to Denver on the Colorado Trail – Pikes Peak Sports

Good luck Brandon!

After months of toiling over logistics and physical preparation, my plan is to complete a self-supported, northbound journey on the Colorado Trail from Durango to Denver using the Collegiate West route.

Track Brandon’s progress here.

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